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Study: Youth attitudes shift in Great Recession

Study: Youth attitudes shift in Great Recession

A new analysis provides a look at ways high school seniors' attitudes shifted in the Great Recession. Photo: Associated Press/Mel Evans

CHICAGO (AP) — Some have wondered how the Great Recession might affect a generation of young people that’s been characterized, unfairly or not, as “entitled.”

Will this recession change them? Will the effect last?

A new analysis of a long-term survey provides a look at ways high school seniors’ attitudes shifted in the first years of this most recent recession.

Among the findings: young people showed signs of being more interested in conserving resources and a bit more concerned about their fellow human beings.

Compared with young people surveyed a few years before the recession, the Great Recession group also showed less interest in having vacation homes and new cars.

But they still placed more importance on those items than young people surveyed in the 1970s, an era with its own economic challenges.

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